Bonus Link–Alan Nasser Wants Students to Organize

Studentpwns linked to this interview of old-school New Dealer Alan Nasser and his new book, The Student Loan Debt Bubble.

[CounterPunch's Mike Whitney]–Why haven’t the victims of these toxic loans used social networking and campus organizing to fight back against this ripoff? Are there grounds for a class action suit? What about organizing a collective action to withhold loan payment for one month to send a message to the banks?

Alan Nasser–There have been isolated instances of efforts to educate and mobilize. My and Kelly Norman’s original article has been made into a booklet by an Indiana University faculty member, for distribution to the student body. And many readers have forwarded the article to their circle. But the key to effective resistance is organization, and the most likely initiators of organization, the left-of-liberal Left, remains dormant. We can’t even get it together to mobilize an antiwar movement in this age of official permanent war.

During the period of widespread student opposition to the Vietnam war there were intercampus communications networks that helped to bring about nationally coordinated demonstrations and draft resistance. A comparable network, organized around the student debt crisis, could be formed if a few campuses got the ball rolling by developing student and faculty organizations dedicated to informing and mobilizing students and those in solidarity with them to resist debt predation. Your suggestion of a payment moratorium is a good one. One of its chief benefits in my opinion would be to draw attention to the issue as a catalyst for the ultimate development of a broader resistance to the entire regime of austerity and debt peonage that the vested interests are imposing on working people.

Alan Nasser is a badass.

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5 Responses

  1. I raised the question of what claims, remedies or defenses the parties might have one month ago at http://kowalskiandassociatesblog.com/2011/01/12/the-new-york-times-asks-is-law-school-a-losing-game-who-should-bear-the-cost-if-indeed-law-school-is-a-losing-game/

    To date, not one single response was filed.

  2. It is frustrating. Canadians are so polite and do not protest – except French Canadians. If you manage to figure out how to do this, please let me know.

  3. American lawyers and JDs – and most young professionals – are too damn busy working on their resumes. They don’t want to rock the boat. In fact, Matt, Kimber and I are the only scambloggers who are not anonymous.

    While I recognize that there are legitimate fears for not wanting to go public, this is pathetic. We now have legal practitioners, “law professors,” political pundits and social commentators pointing out that American “legal education” is a tragic joke.

    Conversely, I have also seen a fair number of trolls and apologist cockroaches who will attack the scam-bloggers, i.e. “You’re a loser. Get over it.” I actually had one piece of trash contact my employer, i.e. “Look at what this idiot is doing.” Luckily, I did not receive any backlash, other than to not blog at work.

    Matt, I am on Cryn Johannsen’s board now. I can ask her if she has any Canadian contacts.

    Jerome Kowalski, I appreciate everything you have done for this cause.

  4. [...] organize against student loans.  That’s what Matt Leichter over at Law School Tuition Bubble pointed out in a link I shared yesterday. Professor Alan Nasser, author of The Student Loan Debt Bubble, notes [...]

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