‘After the JD’ Offers Weak Evidence of JD’s Value

…Is up on The Am Law Daily.

And now ladies and gentlemen, the band called Death.

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This band’s interesting story is the subject of a documentary titled, A Band Called Death, that’s on Netflix.

On the Am Law Daily: ‘ABA Task Force Report: Part Good, Part Baffling’

You can find my latest Am Law Daily article here:

ABA Task Force Report: Part Good, Part Baffling

Per the discussion on my first cut at the topic, I added a little bit more on the possibility of limited-licensing programs reducing costs. There’re other changes to the original post.

http://www.americanlawyer.com/home/id=1202643728147/ABA+Task+Force+Report+Part+Good+Part+Baffling%3Fmcode=1202617075486&curindex=3

Internet Era Has Neglible Effect on Legal Sector Productivity

…Is an unusual finding I made a while back, and it’s a reason not to go to law school. You can read about it on my most recent Am Law Daily article:

No, It’s Still Not a Good Time to Apply to Law School

In the meantime, I saw the Breeders last week, the night before my lecture at The Henry George School of Social Science, which went well thanks for asking. The Breeders are probably the only early ’90s band I’ve had any real interest in seeing. (The Pixies were a bit before my time.)

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I was standing probably 20 feet east by southeast of the bootlegger of this video. I was behind a tall young man wearing a bright orange tuque, indoors. I think people who do that should be arrested and given the indelible mark of the hipster.

The best part of the video is that it’s titled “Canonball,” meaning it complies with Church doctrine.

‘White Flight’ Hits Nation’s Law Schools

…Is up on The Am Law Daily.

It’s pretty stark stuff, perfectly timed for a holiday in which white Americans play a leading part.

[Forgot to mention, The Law School Tuition Bubble has been nominated as one of the ABA Journal's "Blawg 100." Here's its description:

"New York City-based JD and writer Matt Leichter combats rhetoric about the cost-benefit analysis of a legal education—particularly for those who have to borrow vast sums of money for school—with research, which he archives. Leichter devours enrollment data and employment data, finds what's interesting and lays it out. He also finds other news articles and op-eds on his chosen topic, links to them and picks them apart."

If you are so inclined, the link for voting is here.]

Here’s some West Coast Pop Art Experimental Band.

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Fun fact, the Wikipedia says vocalist Bob Markley was a law school graduate. Of course this was before 1960 and he was the adopted son of a wealthy oil man.

‘Accreditation Reform Unlikely to Change Legal Education’ on the Am Law Daily

Accreditation Reform Unlikely to Change Legal Education

I chose not to comment on the renewed attack on law professors’ scholarship in The New York Times as it wasn’t germane to my article. Sure, a few statements from judges and lawyers isn’t a scientific analysis of journal articles’ value, but as I see it, the law of diminishing returns should tell us that adding 30%+ more full-time, non-clinical, journal-article-writing instructors to law schools over 15 years can’t really add much social utility if the graduates can’t get jobs.

So… How many people are dressing up as Sister Ray for Halloween?

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‘Law School Tuition Will Rise Despite Applicant Nosevdive’ on The Am Law Daily

Law School Tuition Will Rise Despite Applicant Nosedive

[MINI-UPDATE: In the article, I mentioned that the University of Arkansas still had its 2012-13 tuition rates posted as of the time of the dean's Bloomberg Law interview. As of September 4, it still hasn't been updated.]

I’ve been listening to this song on repeat, which I guess means I like it. I saw Fear of Men in New York City in June. Good show, but no one bootlegged this song for some reason.

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The Economic Value of the 58,000th Minute of Law School

…Is totally what I would’ve titled my Am Law Daily article on “The Economic Value of a Law Degree” if I didn’t have to waste words explaining it. Instead you’re getting:

Paper on Law Degree’s Value a Non Sequitur

There are two things, among many others, I wanted to add to the article that didn’t make it to the final cut:

(1) On page 44, it says,

Thus, on average and ignoring obvious behavioral changes, the federal government would hypothetically profit from legal education even if it provided legal education free at the point of service.

This is about the moment that I opened to the possibility that “Economic Value” was a hoax like Alan Sokal’s famous “Transgressing the Boundaries: Toward a Transformative Hermeneutics of Quantum Gravity,” because it’s the exact kind of absurd policy proposal that a satirist would put into an article claiming law school is worth the money. Just hedging my bets. (Please be a hoax. Please be hoax. Please be hoax.)

(2) Otherwise, “Economic Value” is the “Reinhart and Rogoff” of legal education. I’m surprised I haven’t seen the parallel made elsewhere, and we really should have seen it coming. Sure, it’s probably not going to contain any MS Excel errors or strange weightings, but it’s causal theory is equally nonsensical and should not be taken any more seriously than “Growth in a Time of Debt” is taken today. If anything it should be less so given that we can find graduates and drop outs who did not benefit from law school even as we can find countries that struggle with debt and low growth.

‘State Bar Proposals Fail to Address Law Students’ Woes’ on The Am Law Daily

State Bar Proposals Fail to Address Law Students’ Woes

My favorite part of this article is the delicious line about the Luddites.

Brief correction: In the article I referred to one of the reports as coming from the “California Bar Association,” it’s actually the “State Bar of California.” Two different organizations. My mistake. I apologize.

Reinhart and Rogoff Had It Easy

The updated version of my Am Law Daily article, “Most States Saw Lawyer Surplus Grow From 2009 to 2011” is now online with correct information about the number of Nevada bar admits. There is still no new datum on the anomalous average annual lawyer job increase in Mississippi due to its negative or zero replacement rate. I am told the Mississippi Department of Employment Security will publish its numbers shortly, but that was weeks ago. Overall, the modifications to the article are trivial and do not remotely call my arguments or conclusions into question, which is that there is no Shangri-La legal market out there for law graduates and new lawyers to move to.

Let me just add (brag) that the update is a clarification and not a correction because I copied the source data precisely and had no obvious reason to question the numbers they presented. Thus, there are no Reinhart/Rogoff-style spreadsheet errors to apologize for. However, going forward, I will be more vigilant. Apparently, not everyone is as meticulous in their data collection and presentation as I am.

On The Am Law Daily: ‘IBR May Not Bar Some Student Debtors From Shedding Debt’

IBR May Not Bar Some Student Debtors From Shedding Debt

Been busy recently, mainly inputting Official Guide data into spreadsheets. Interesting stuff. Will write more on it.

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