Tuition Cuts Beyond Thunderdome

Observing some law schools gaining 1Ls as they cut tuition, The Wall Street Journal chants, “Two applicants enter! One applicant enrolls! Two applicants enter! One applicant enrolls!”

I don’t think I’ve ever seen Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome without commercials. I don’t think there’s another way either.

Back on topic, the WSJ article appears quite well researched. I’ve never been big on tuition cuts drawing the crowds, but I’m willing to disagree with some of the quoted deans—in their favor, even—and say that the tuition cuts helped their enrollments. The real question, though, is whether tuition cuts can draw applicants who otherwise wouldn’t bother taking the LSAT. I ask that because it appears that the applicants are sending their materials to multiple schools and taking whatever they consider the best deal. In that sense the nominal tuition cuts are little different from the discounts the law schools have been touting. It’s when they can convince new applicants to step out of the ether that we can really say the tuition cuts are working.

We’ll also have to see whether the schools with high LSAT profiles are cutting their nominal costs. I bet plenty of 2Ls would love to transfer into Columbia and pay more than $55,000 per year.

In other news, the New York Fed people have started a series titled, “The Value of a College Degree,” which rehashes everything you’ve already heard repeatedly about the average college graduate. However, its authors promise to look at wage dispersions, which tell them that “college actually does not appear to have paid off for a sizable fraction of those who made the investment.” They said it’s hard to see whether the premium is due to innate abilities but then said they were going to explore what happens to five- and six-year graduates. Hint: If the five- and six-year graduates don’t make more than the four-year graduates, there’s a good reason to suspect that there are problems with the human capital hypothesis.

Here’s my spoiler version of the wage dispersion from a while back:

Dispersal of Earnings by Education (25 -34) (Thousands, 2012)

(Vertical lines are medians.)

Yeah, so not everyone who went to college makes the median income. (Mind = blown)

I gotta run. Take care, folks.

3 comments

  1. What’s interesting is that the median for ‘some college, no degree’ is only a hair higher than for ‘high school/GED’, and far lower than for ‘Associate Degree’. This fits in with the credentialing/signalling theory and contradicts the human capital theory.

  2. What’s interesting is that the median for ‘some college, no degree’ is only a hair higher than for ‘high school/GED’, and far lower than for ‘Associate Degree’. This fits in with the credentialing/signalling theory and contradicts the human capital theory.

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