Assessing Increasing Acceptance Rates on LSAT Scores

…In animated form.

It’s been a few years since I’ve animated anything for readers, so y’all deserve one. Here’s the cumulative change in law schools’ full-time matriculant LSAT scores by the change in their acceptance rates among the non-Puerto Rico law schools that were around in 2010.

You may need to click on it to get the full effect.

Change in LSAT Score by Change in Acceptance Rate

I use 2010 as the base year because applicants are sending out more applications on average since the 2007 trough year.

2013 saw a bigger change in LSAT scores than the other years, including 2014, but the change in average acceptance rates has been slowing down since 2012. Part of the problem with this kind of analysis (and why I’m keeping this post short) is that we don’t know the schools’ mean scores rather than the percentiles, which are real people. Still, the effects look pretty bunched together. In 2014, the mean law school’s 75th percentile full-time matriculant’s LSAT score is about 2.2 points lower compared to 2010. That’s -2.8 points for the median matriculant and -3.4 points for the 25th percentile matriculant. These don’t “feel” like a lot to me, but LSAT scores—assuming they’re reported correctly—can be quite rigid among schools.

That’s all for now, folks.

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