Voodoo Links

I’ve been asking myself recently what standards a topic needs to meet before I’ll post on it, and while there’s no point in giving a list of criteria, one thing I try to look for is information readers won’t find at other sites, particularly more heavily trafficked ones. Consider it my offer to readers. So, I thought to myself that maybe I should occasionally point out instances of good work that teaches me something I didn’t know. (It would certainly give me an opportunity to practice not being a meanie in my writing.) I can think of two examples from the last month+.

Law School Truth Center, “LSAT Scores Do Not and Cannot Predict Bar Exam Scores,” Outside the Law School Scam, November 20, 2014.

I have to thank the normally satirical LSTC for playing it straight and explaining item type theory and equating to me. It didn’t just illuminate how standardized testing works; it spared my readers disputable longitudinal comparisons between law school classes. I especially appreciate the post because until then I had no interest in last summer’s bar exam debacle.

Mitchell D. Weiss, “Don’t Believe the Hype: There’s Still a Student Loan Crisis,” Credit.com, January 5, 2015.

June 2014 blessed us with a policy paper by Beth Akers and Matthew Chingos of the Brookings Institution ridiculing our assertions that there’s a student loan “crisis” on the horizon. Weiss does us a favor by summarizing many of the Brookings Institution’s policy papers over the last year arguing that the student debt system is fine but it’s those irresponsible kids taking on too much debt that’s the problem. I’m wary of giving Brookings any more attention than it already gets: The last thing we need is more genuflecting to D.C. think tanks, but Weiss’ contribution is a solid analysis for anyone interested in Brookings’ position on higher education and student loan debt.

I hope to get to substantive stuff soon.

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